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What Adam Smith Ate: In Which We Finally Discuss Herring

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Adam Smith, whose father was a customs agent, had practically grown up on the wharf in Kirkaldy, Scotland, By the 1770s, he could see first-hand the how hard it was for small Scottish fisherman to stay afloat. They were … … . Surround them with the boiled potatoes, and serve the sour cream on the side. What to Read (or Eat) More? Previous posts in our "What Adam Smith Ate" series The Appendix on Herring and Salt in the Wealth of Nations #WEALTHOFTWEETS Addendum on Herring

What Adam Smith Ate – Potatoes

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Whether you're commenting on the best source of nourishment for day laborers (as Adam Smith did) or trying to figure out what to do with your leftovers, the Scottish classic Rumbledethump made with mashed or “rumbled” … … and mix until well combined. 5. Put the mixture into the baking dish. Top with the cheese. Bake 25-30 minutes until the top is crusty and browned. Want to Read More? What Adam Smith Ate: In Which We Discuss Oats Where Turnips Turn Up in Adam Smith's World

What Adam Smith Ate: Vinegar

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks In Adam Smith’s household, it’s likely that his mother or cousin, Janet Douglas, would have ensured the cooks pickled vegetables or fermented cabbage or turnips. … work, especially since these are pickles for the refrigerator. Want more? Previous posts in our "What Adam Smith Ate" series Adam Smith, Madame Geneva, and the Consequences of Liquor Prohibition What Adam Smith Ate: In Which We Finally Discuss Herring

What Adam Smith Ate: Salt

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Salt would have been in Adam Smith’s food, kitchen, and perhaps even on the table. But more than that, Smith understand that salt was a commodity that was used and traded and of great importance to world markets. … of sauerkraut and meats, surrounded by potatoes. Garnish with French mustards and the remaining chopped parsley. What to Read (or Eat) More? Previous posts in our "What Adam Smith Ate" series The Appendix on Herring and Salt in the Wealth of Nations

What Adam Smith Ate: Apple Charlotte

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Adam Smith was known to King George III and was in London managing corrections to TMS around the time of the King's marriage and coronation in the autumn of 1761. It’s very possible Smith enjoyed a celebratory meal or two … … of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds on EconLib Lesson Plan: An Evening with the Wise Guys on AdamSmithWorks In this lesson, students examine the economic ideas of three friends: Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin, and David Hume.

What Adam Smith Ate (& Drank!): Claret, Part 2

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Adam Smith knew first-hand about the Bordeaux wine growing region and he factored his knowledge of wine and agriculture into An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. … and sauce. Still thirsty? Renee Wilmeth's What Adam Smith Ate (& Drank!): Claret, Part 1 Previous posts in our "What Adam Smith Ate" series Sarah Skwire's Free Trade in Language: Adam Smith on Words and Wine Adam Smith on Good Wine and Free Trade

What Adam Smith Ate: An Assize of Bread

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks "We are familiar with [Adam Smith's] ideas about wheat, the potato and corn. But readers may be less familiar with the idea of 'assizes' or local regulations on those same loaves." … More from AdamSmithWorks: Nathanael Snow's What Would Adam Smith Say About Fasting? Jacob Sider Jost's Bargaining with the Butcher, Baker, and Brewer: A New Look at Smith’s Most Famous Sentences Wealth of Nations Reading Guide on Bk 4, Ch 5, "Of Bounties"

What Adam Smith Ate: Cheese

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Adam Smith wrote “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest.” He could have added the cheesemonger, too... … Ate: Voltaire and the Vegetarian Salad (features goat cheese) Adam Smith: Myths and Realities, Myth 2: Adam Smith argued that the welfare gains from free trade among nations were limited to countries’ exploitation of their production cost advantages.

What Adam Smith Ate: Tea (& maybe Breakfast Scones)

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Tea in Scotland during Smith’s time was a critical component of breakfast (along with coffee, which was more common at home in Scotland than in England). A classic breakfast during Smith’s time was tea and toast – or rolls … … , and clotted cream. Want to Read More? Previous posts in our "What Adam Smith Ate" series Can drinking tea turn you into a ‘harlot’? – The History of Love (wordpress.com) WealthofTweets on Taxes in the Wealth of Nations (on Twitter) and here (on ASW)

Paris Salons and Chestnut Soup with Lobster (What Adam Smith Ate)

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Smith was a regular at Paul-Henri Thiry Baron d’Holbach’s weekly dinners. Holbach was a leading figure of the French Enlightenment and one of the members of the French society developing the Encyclopedia His salon was one …

What Adam Smith Ate: Cream Crowdie Dessert at The Oyster Club

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Cream crowdie is a dish of whipped cream, sweetened oats and berries, not to be confused with trifle which includes custard and sometimes cake. It's a perfect light dessert to follow a heavy meal and exactly the sort of … … of Genius: An Introduction to the Scottish Enlightenment | Adam Smith Works The Club: Johnson, Boswell, and the Friends Who Shaped an Age by Leo Damrosch The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook by Niall Ferguson

What Adam Smith Ate: The Venerable Fruit Shrub

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks When we hear "shrub" today, many of us think of a plant. Yet as Wilmeth shows, the shrub is also a drink with a rich history, dating back to the days of Adam Smith. We know what Adam Smith liked to drink. Claret, which we would call Bordeaux, beer, brandy, and even the occasional punch. But we haven’t talked about the venerable shrub, as much a cornerstone of pub life in the 18th century as soda fountain drinks are …

What Adam Smith Ate (& Drank!): Chocolate

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Hot chocolate was not as popular in England or Scotland as it was in France and Spain but Smith certainly would have known about it and perhaps tried in during his travels or at home. … knowledge and/or beverages from Renee Wilmeth? What Adam Smith Ate (& Drank!): Claret What Adam Smith Ate: A Tribute to Strawberries Adam Smith, Madame Geneva, and the Consequences of Liquor Prohibition What Adam Smith Ate: Tea (& maybe Breakfast Scones)

What Adam Smith Ate: Christmas Punch

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Smith would have enjoyed his favorite claret, what we would call Bordeaux today, as well as, perhaps, a Christmas punch.

What Adam Smith Ate (& Drank!): Claret

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks "Smith’s use of wine to demonstrate everything from supply and demand, costs of goods, duties, and tariffs arguably made him the first wine economist tracking values, appreciation, and retail prices." … Claret, Part 2 Previous posts in our "What Adam Smith Ate" series Sarah Skwire's Free Trade in Language: Adam Smith on Words and Wine Adam Smith on Good Wine and Free Trade WealthofTweets on Taxes in the Wealth of Nations (on Twitter) and here (on ASW)

What Adam Smith Ate: In Which we Discuss Oats

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks November 16, 2020 … , G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1904 Read the previous What Adam Smith Ate posts: A Tribute to Strawberries (Simple Strawberry Jam) The Picnic (Smoked Trout Rillettes) The Tavern Supper (Chicken & Mushrooms) Scurvy, Tar Water, and Bone Broth (Bone Broth)

What Adam Smith Ate: Basque Cabbage Soup

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks Born of the mountains and the border with the Basque region of Spain, Garbure is a hearty vegetable soup featuring beans and the confit duck legs of the Languedoc region, along with a good dose of Basque pepper spice, …

What Adam Smith Ate: Scotch Broth

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks "Soups were practical because they were the perfect way to cook vegetables with broth even if there was no meat in the house. Barley, oats, or potatoes could make a soup hearty. Cooks could also add fish or meat to go … … the cooking time. More soups Adam Smith (and friends): Bone Broth (The very first What Adam Smith Ate post!) Basque Cabbage Soup Soup a la Reine Cock-a-leekie Soup More to read: "The Wealth of Nations" Reading Guide, Book IV, Chapter 5 "Of Bounties"

What Adam Smith Ate: Scottish Game

Renee Wilmeth for AdamSmithWorks England was known for the goose – stuffed and roasted – but in Scotland, Adam Smith would most likely have sat down to a wild game bird like partridge or pheasant. When we think of the centerpiece of the formal 18th century meal, we think about meat. Typically, guests would be served “a leg” or a “joint’ of pork, lamb, or beef, depending on what was available. But in the winter, especially for the holidays, the …